WEIS Valentines Giveaway

The Relationship Between Students and COVID Concerns

Nearly 30% of students across the U.S., are opting out of attending college altogether, due to COVID-19.  Studies indicate 36% of students in the U.S. have chosen a different learning format such as on-line classes, and 9% of students previously enrolled have switched schools.

In Alabama, 24% (approximately 58,700 students) canceled their college plans; 26% will obtain education through a different method 13% will take less classes and 14% have changed schools.  It seems that NOT having health insurance is the leading cause for these changes; for people between the ages of 19 and 25, more than 4.2 million of them are not covered.  Because most colleges and universities require students to have some form of health insurance upon enrollment, experts state it is advised that they stay on their parents’ plan which allows students to do so until they are 26 years of age.

Here are some other ways for students to secure health insurance:

  • Apply for a plan through their school. Primary care services at cheaper prices ($10-$20 copays) can be found at most campuses’ student health centers. A waiver will be required as proof of other coverage if this method is rejected.
  • Buy a policy through the health insurance marketplace at healthcare.gov. Independent students with low income may even qualify for Medicaid.
  • Opt into a catastrophic plan. These plans are ideal for covering sudden serious illnesses and injuries. Catastrophic plans aren’t for everyone, though, as they often have a yearly deductible of $7,350 and minimal primary care coverage.

The best combination for students on a tight budget is staying as healthy as possible, while enrolling in a catastrophic plan, and utilizing benefits of cheap primary care at their college or university’s student health center.  Being vaccinated for – diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; polio; measles; mumps; rubella; and Hepatitis B are required by state law.

(AL.COM/www.al.com)

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print