Twin City Used Cars
WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210 • WWW.BOBBYLEDBETTER.COM • 256-844-2210

Hot Weather On The Way

hot-weather

It has been a cooler than normal July so far, but that’s about to change with temperatures in the 90s expected for Wednesday and Thursday.

Now is a good time to remember some basic heat safety tips.

Obviously it is best to limit outdoor activities during the hottest part of the day.

According to the National Weather Service, during extremely hot and humid weather the body’s ability to cool itself is affected. When the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating, body temperature rises and heat-related illnesses may develop.

Heat-related illnesses can range from heat cramps to heat exhaustion to more serious heat stroke. Heat stroke can result in death and requires immediate medical attention.

Symptoms include: Altered mental state, possible throbbing headache, confusion, nausea, dizziness, shallow breathing, a body temperature of 106-degrees or higher, dry skin or excessive sweating, rapid pulse and possible unconsciousness.

If you suspect someone is suffering from heatstroke move them to a cooler, preferably air-conditioned, environment. Reduce body temperature with a water mister and fan or sponging. Use fan if heat index temperatures are below the high 90s. If temperature rises again, repeat process and Do NOT give fluids.

It is vital to seek medical treatment immediately. Any delay can prove fatal.

Older adults and young children are the most susceptible to heat-related illnesses. Other factors include obesity, fever, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, prescription drug and alcohol use, and sunburn.

Also when it’s hot, never leave children or pets in parked vehicles.

Each year, dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia.

Leaving the windows slightly open does not significantly decrease the heating rate.

The effects can be more severe on children because their bodies warm at a faster rate than adults.

 

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.